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NATIONAL ASSEMBLY HANSARD 10 OCTOBER 2018 VOL 45 NO 11

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PARLIAMENT OF ZIMBABWE

Wednesday, 10th October, 2018

The National Assembly met at a Quarter-past Two O’clock p.m.

PRAYERS

(THE HON. SPEAKER in the Chair)

          Hon. Sacco having answered his cellphone.

THE HON. SPEAKER: Order, Order, Hon. Sacco, the rules are very clear, you cannot use your cellphone in the House. – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

          Some Hon. Members having insisted on sitting on opposition benches with Members of opposition strongly objecting.

THE HON. SPEAKER: Order, order! We have taken quite a bit of time of your question time.  There is some confusion emanating from somewhere about the sitting arrangement which I shall deal with.  Let us go by the tradition that we have been adopting all along since independence.  So if there is a problem, approach the Chair and not start making noise – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections] - Order, order! Hon. Ndebele, order please!

ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE HON. SPEAKER

VISITORS IN THE SPEAKERS’ GALLERY

THE HON. SPEAKER: I have to acknowledge the presence in the Speaker’s Gallery of girls from schools in Mashonaland East Province led by Plan International Zimbabwe in commemoration of the International Day of the Girl Child.  You are most welcome.

ORAL CHOLERA VACCINATION EXERCISE

THE HON. SPEAKER: The Oral Cholera Vaccination Exercise which started today will continue tomorrow, on Thursday, 11th October 2018, in the National Assembly, commencing with a presentation at 0900hrs.

INTERNATIONAL DAY OF THE GIRL CHILD COMMEMORATION

THE HON. SPEAKER: I wish to inform the House that there will be an International Day of the Girl Child Commemoration on Thursday, 11th October, 2018 at Parliament Building from 1000hrs.  The theme for this year’s commemoration is “Amplifying girls’ voices, leadership and the urgency to advance girls rights within 2030 sustainable development agenda. Plan International will be bringing girls from all over the country to learn about the Legislature and interact with Members of Parliament. All Members of Parliament are welcome to this event.

APOLOGIES RECEIVED FROM MINISTERS

          THE HON. SPEAKER: The list of Ministers with leave of absence is as follows:

1.    Hon. Prof Murwira, Minister of Higher and Tertiary Education, Science and Technology Development;

2.    Hon. K. Kazembe, Minister of ICT and Courier Services;

3.    Hon. J.B. Matiza, Minister of Transport and Infrastructural Development;

4.    Hon. D. Marapira, Minister of State in Vice President Mohadi’s Office;

5.    Hon. J. N. Mhlanga, Deputy Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing;

6.    Hon. P. Kambamura, Deputy Minister of Mines and Mining Development;

7.    Hon. Z. Ziyambi, Minister of Justice, Legal and Parliamentary Affairs;

8.    Hon. Prof M. Ncube, Minister of Finance an Economic Development – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] -

The Minister of Finance and Economic Development is outside the country on Government business. Your request that he should make a Ministerial Statement is not lost. It is still there when he comes back.

ORAL ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS WITHOUT NOTICE

          HON. CHIKWINYA: I stand on a matter of privilege in terms of Standing Order Number 68 (d) read together with Standing Order Number 69. Section 119 of the Constitution confers myself as a Member of Parliament and collectively as legislators here present with the protection of the Constitution. Section 107 (2) demands that the  Minister must come to Parliament to answer questions. The Minister of Finance and Economic Development was last here on the day the President presented the State of the Nation Address. He is prepared to address conferences, making legislative promulgations which have got an effect on ……

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Order! I am sorry you are out of order – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] - The Hon. Minister is out of the country on official business. He is coming back. You cannot talk about his absence. I have ruled. Please sit down! – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] - Can you sit down otherwise you will be out.

          HON. NDEBELE: I beg to rise on a matter of privilege. Last week same time on a Wednesday, I asked a question to the Minister of Information and because she was at sea you asked me to write that question down in order to direct her. Before I could do so in yesterday’s newspaper The Herald, the former secretary of that Ministry decided to answer me through a newspaper article which I truly believe is very unfair. If it is not disrespectful of this House or my person as a Member of Parliament, it is indeed disrespectful of the Minister herself.

          It is important because in the past you have said we must not talk about people who are not in this House because they cannot defend themselves. What happens if they bring their nose into this Chamber, they open themselves to ridicule.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Which question was it on the Order Paper?

HON. NDEBELE: It was a question on why the Ministry of Information….

THE HON. SPEAKER: Is it on the Order Paper?

HON. NDEBELE: No, before I could do that he was answering me  and they were citing me – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] -  I stand my ground Hon. Speaker. They cited me by name. For the poor journalism that they practice at The Herald, they never granted me an opportunity of reply. So I am going to reply them in this Chamber.

THE HON. SPEAKER: I got your point of order.

HON. NDEBELE: I honestly believe senior civil servants like George Charamba must be brought to order by this very House. He cannot respond to substantive matters of policy via the newspapers. He cannot prevaricate on a matter that he clearly does not understand. I stand my ground, I am Member of Parliament in my own right. I represent the people of Magwegwe. I cannot be ridiculed by an individual and fail to answer back.

THE HON. SPEAKER: Take a seat. I got your point of order. Hon. Ndebele, if you could kindly get that caption of the paper, we would like to study it and make a decision after I have seen it. I had recognised someone to speak. – [HON. NDUNA:  You had recognised me for a question Mr. Speaker and it is directed to the Minister of Mines]- Order. There was an Hon. Member in front who wanted to ask a question – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

          Hon. P. D. Sibanda having stood up to speak.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Hon. Sibanda, are you disputing my plea?  If you have got an issue, please approach the Chair.  Thank you.

          HON. TOFFA: Mr. Speaker Sir, we are supposed to be the first.  We cannot have men talking before us after you promised.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: I will do it, do not worry, I have not forgotten.

          HON. TOFFA: It seems like you have Mr. Speaker Sir.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Please sit down, I have not forgotten.

*HON. TEKESHE: My question is directed to the Minister of Home Affairs and Cultural Heritage.  Under the new dispensation, I want to ask that in 2008 – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

THE HON. SPEAKER: Order Hon. Member, can you please ask the question.  Do not make a statement.

HON. TEKESHE: In 2008, many people were killed – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – Many people were killed but no one was prosecuted.  So, in the new dispensation – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

THE HON. SPEAKER: Order, order.  If you do not want to ask a question I will send you out.  Ask your question.

*HON. TEKESHE: When are you going to prosecute the people responsible for the killings? – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

THE HON. SPEAKER: Hon. Member, I did not follow your question.  This is the last warning. Can you ask your question and Members be quiet.

*HON. TEKESHE: I was asking when the prosecution of the people who conducted killings in 2008 will be done – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

*THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS AND CULTURAL HERITAGE (HON. MADIRO): Mr. Speaker Sir, Hon. Tekeshe asked a question…

Hon. Chikwinya having stood up between the Hon. Minister speaking and the Chair.

THE HON. SPEAKER: Hon. Member, can you go out please.  You want an answer, you must be in silence.  Leave the Chamber – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – Can we listen to the Minister’s answer?

*HON. MADIRO: Mr. Speaker Sir, Hon. Tekeshe asked a question and my response is that; the Hon. Member knows that when someone commits a crime, it is supposed to be reported to the police –  [HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear.] – The police do not just prosecute, they do a thorough investigation and come up with a reasonable suspicion that a crime has been committed.  Hon. Tekeshe knows that when a crime is committed and is reported and a reasonable suspicion is built, it will be taken to court for trial and the police surrender it to the courts.  So, a case is not surrendered to the courts first before a suspect is  taken for investigations to take place.  So, if Hon. Tekeshe has any evidence on any such killings, they should bring the evidence to the police for investigations – [HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear.] –

THE HON. SPEAKER: Order, order.  The Hon. Deputy Minister has been quite clear on the procedure and I cannot allow a supplement – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

*HON. NDUNA:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  My question goes to the Minister of Mines.  What measures does the Government have in terms of reserved areas?  Are there any measures of allocating the reserved land to the small-scale miners?  What plans do you have in terms of reserved areas that were reserved by the Government for gold mining to increase our wealth and grow our economy?

THE MINISTER OF MINES AND MINING DEVELOPMENT (HON. CHITANDO):  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  I would like to thank the Hon. Member for his question.  I would like to advise the Hon. Member that Government is in the process of rolling out gold service centres which will be rolled out throughout the country.  The first gold centre Mr. Speaker Sir, was commissioned in Bubi in July and there are plans to commission a further four gold centres before the end of December.  As we go on, there is an evaluation in all the mining districts in the country to ensure that where it makes economic sense, gold service centres will be established. 

To answer the Hon. Member’s question, evaluation will be taking place throughout all the mining districts and the areas will be opened up where applicable and justifiable to small-scale miners with the subsequent establishment of gold service centres.  I thank you Mr. Speaker.

HON. NDUNA:  Supplementary question – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] –

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order, order.  Where the Hon. Minister’s reply is adequate, as so adjudged by the Chair, I shall not allow supplementary questions.

HON. T. MOYO:  My question is directed to the Minister of Mines and Mining Development.  How does the Ministry of Mines and Mining Development advance President E. D. Mnangagwa’s mantra, ‘Zimbabwe is Open for Business’ in bringing new investment opportunities in Gokwe Chireya which is endowed with large – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] –

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order, order.  Hon. Zwizwai!  Order Hon. Member!  Question time is to ask Hon. Ministers on issues of policy, not on matters that relate to your constituency. 

HON. CHOMBO:  I direct my question to the Minister of Primary and Secondary Education, Prof. Mavima.  Can the Minister explain the Government policy on funding for textbooks for both primary and secondary schools?  Is there funding for it?  Is there a budget set aside for it?  If there is a budget for it, what was the budget for this fiscal year and how much has been disbursed so far?  I thank you.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order, order.  Hon. Members, you ask question on policy.

HON. TOFFA:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  Before I ask my question....

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Hon. Sikhala, with all due respect please, out.  Order, order.  

HON. TOFFA:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  Before I ask my question, I would like to register my concern with regards to the gender issue.  I feel that the women Parliamentarians ...

          THE HON SPEAKER:  Please ask your question.

          HON. TOFFA: Yes but I must register that concern.  My question is to the Minister of Primary and Secondary Education.  Is it Government policy to disallow children without birth certificates from registering for entry to schools?  Furthermore, children have been sent away from school for not paying school fees and the Minister has said it is not Government policy.  I would like to know what measures the Minister is taking to make sure that all children go to school.

          THE MINISTER OF PRIMARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION (HON. PROF. MAVIMA):  It is not Government policy to disallow learners without birth certificates to be registered in schools but parents should strive to ensure that such learners at some point get the documentation that is needed because those documents will be required for the writing of examinations especially at Grade 7 and later on.  We have also said on several occasions in this House that it is not Government policy to exclude any learner from school for non-payment of fees.  We have indicated that if it is happening in any particular school, we should be told so that action can be taken against the school leadership that is practising such behaviour.

          HON. TOFFA:  Hon. Minister, I appreciate your answer but there are children that have parents that do not have birth certificates.  What are the children supposed to do if their parents do not have birth certificates?  Can the Minister not find a formula that allows children with parents that cannot get birth certificates to go to school?

          HON. PROF. MAVIMA:  As a Ministry, we have not excluded any learner but the onus is on the guardians or the parents to make sure that there is documentation for the learners, especially beyond Grade 7.  We have had some learners going through Grade 7 but once they want to proceed beyond that, then there is a requirement for documentation.  In terms of a solution to the documentation issue, I do not have jurisdiction over that.

          HON. MKARATIGWA:  Allow me on behalf of the people of Shurugwi South Constituency  - [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

          THE HON SPEAKER:  Order, Hon. Member, you do not ask questions relative to your constituency.  You ask questions on policy.

          HON. CHIBAYA:  In the absence of the Minister of Transport, I refer my question to the Leader of the House.

          THE HON SPEAKER: Order, order.  Hon Mkaratigwa, are you with me.  It would appear we need another induction.  Order, order Hon. Member standing, please take your seat.  It is not pleasant to be telling Hon. Members that you cannot ask questions further because we are asking questions on national policy to the Hon. Ministers.  Please be guided accordingly.

          HON. CHIBAYA:  I was saying in the absence of the Minister of Transport, I will refer my question to the Leader of the House.  What is Government policy on ground breaking of projects that they never start on for example the Masvingo road?

          THE MINISTER OF DEFENCE (HON. MUCHINGURI-KASHIRI):  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  Let me thank the Hon. Member for that very important question.  We appreciate that the nation has for a long time been waiting for this road to start but I want to indicate to this Hon. House that only yesterday, Cabinet was discussing this matter and we are almost at the verge now of agreeing and signing a contract.  I would rather that question be directed to the Minister when he is ready with the presentation.  I thank you.

          Hon. Zwizwai having stood up to ask a question before being recognised by the Hon. Speaker.

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order, Hon. Zwizwai respect the Chair.  What is that yes, yes.  Do not say yes.  Can you ask the question? 

          *HON. ZWIZWAI:  Sorry Mr. Speaker for the mistake that I made.  My supplementary question is that Minister, if you are saying that you are almost there in terms of signing the contract, when you did the ground breaking ceremony, what were you doing?  How can you have a ground breaking ceremony without a contractor and without a contract then you say you have commissioned the construction of the road?  Is that practical?

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order, order.  Hon. Zwizwai, in terms of our Standing Orders, you address the Chair.  Please can you repeat your question?

          *HON. ZWIZWAI:  Thank you Mr. Speaker for educating me.  My question Hon. Speaker is that, when the Government sent the President of the nation to go and do the ground breaking ceremony at Chaka, how did he do this without the contract, because we are told that they are almost done in terms of signing the contract.  How can you have a ground breaking ceremony without a contractor to do the work?  I thank you.

          *HON. MUCHINGURI-KASHIRI:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  I want to thank the Hon. Zwizwai for that question.  It is true that the ground breaking ceremony was done last year.  The Government had contracted a certain company for the contract but later on it was discovered that that company had not been honest in its dealings, such that the new dispensation, the Second Republic saw the problems that arose from the contract and they withdrew the contract and considered other companies who had tendered for the same contract.  So due diligence was done and interrogations were made to see whether the company had the money to do that.  So I do not want to preempt things that the Minister is supposed to inform us on but I want to say that, we are correcting mistakes that had been made before.  So, all I ask for is that they give us time to work on this.  I thank you.

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order, order.  The Hon. Minister has admitted and when there is an admission, I do not think I can allow further supplementary questions.

          HON. SACCO:  Mr. Speaker Sir, my question is directed to the Deputy Minister of Energy and Power Development Hon. Mudyiwa and my question is, what Government policy do we have in place or what assurance do we have to the nation that we are going to have adequate fuel supplies for our country, considering that we have increased demand for fuel due to an increased economic activity after the Second Republic?  And, also that our fuel is the cheapest in the region – what can we do to make sure that it is not diverted to the black market? – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] -

          THE HON. SPEAKER:   Order, order. 

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER DEVELOPMENT (HON. MUDYIWA):  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  I would like to thank Hon. Sacco for such a pertinent question, particularly now that we are going through this turbulence.  Unfortunately, I could not grasp all the questions because of the noise that was going on.

          THE HON. SPEAKER:  Thank you Hon. Minister.  Can Hon. Sacco please repeat your question quickly?

          *HON. SACCO:  Hon. Speaker, my question is concerning fuel.  We have seen that after the new dispensation, there are a lot of economic activities and our fuel is the cheapest in the region when we compare it to US dollar prices.  So, what measures have they put in place to ensure that it does not find its way into the black market.  What can we do to ensure that fuel does not find its way to the black market?  I thank you.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF ENERGY AND POWER DEVELOPMENT (HON. MUDYIWA): On the first question when the Hon. Member asked about the policy on fuel, whether we have got enough fuel in the country.  As the Ministry of Energy and Power Development, our mandate is to make sure that we have got enough fuel in the country and that is what we are implementing.  That is exactly what we are doing as a Ministry – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjection.] -

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order, order.  Hon. Member seated there, allow the Hon. Minister to answer the question.

HON. MUDYIWA:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir, the Ministry, through the Zimbabwe Energy Regulatory Authority (ZERA), we are trying our best to make sure there is enough fuel in the country.  Following this upsurge in the withdrawal of fuel from the service stations which was unprecedented, we have implemented certain measures to ensure that there is enough fuel in the country.

Firstly, we have enough fuel that is being pumped into the country through our pipe lines and is being stored at the Feruka tanks and at the Msasa Storage Tanks, but the major problem that we are encountering is that even though fuel is in the country, we cannot withdraw it without payment of the required funds.  This is because there has been an upsurge in usage of fuel following the increased economic activity probably due to the benefits of the new dispensation.  We have enough fuel in the country.  That I can assure you, but the challenge is that we do not have enough foreign currency to pay for the fuel so that it is withdrawn by the fuel suppliers and taken to the wholesalers and the retailers.

The queues are continuing - yes, but this is all because of speculation.  Following the panic buying that has been going on in the country, there is a lot of hording of fuel in the country.  There is a lot of unprecedented withdrawal of fuel in the country which has caused all this artificial shortage in the country, but there is enough fuel in our storage tanks.  We have our storage tanks and we also have strategic reserves for fuel in the country.  I can assure you, we have enough fuel, diesel and blend to take the country through for the next 36 days.  From Saturday there has been pumping in of over 6 000 000 litres of diesel and blend into the country on a daily basis, but the problem, like I said before, we cannot withdraw it without payment upfront.

The Reserve Bank has been trying to provide the funds.  I am sure most of you have read in the newspaper that the Reserve Bank has availed US$41 million for payment of fuel and that fuel we have paid for is in the country.  Thank you, Mr. Speaker Sir – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjection.] -

*HON. SACCO:  Mr. Speaker Sir, my question is how can we avoid panic buying because fuel supply - from what I heard, is adequate for Zimbabwe?  So, what policy do we have to avoid panic buying and people from hoarding fuel? – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjection.] - There are people engaged in panic buying and are hoarding fuel to create artificial shortages.

HON. MUDYIWA:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  The Zimbabwe Energy Regulatory Authority is out there to investigate the real causes of the panic buying – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjection.] -

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order, order!

HON. MUDYIWA: Sooner or later, following our assurances that there is enough fuel in the country, the panic buying will disappear and a report from ZERA is being awaited on what is going on in the fuel market.  Thank you.  

HON. MADZIMURE:  Thank you Mr. Speaker.  The Hon. Minister told us that there is no money to pay for the fuel.  She then went on to say there is enough fuel.

THE HON. SPEAKER:  What is your supplementary question?

HON. MADZIMURE:  When is the Government going to pay for the fuel because there is no fuel? – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjection.] -

THE HON. SPEAKER:  Order, order.  Can the Hon. Member be heard in silence so that the Hon. Minister can also hear the supplementary question?

HON. MADZIMURE:  Thank you Mr. Speaker.  I want the Hon. Minister to clarify the point where she said there is no money.  When is the Government going to avail enough money to buy fuel which is in short supply?

          HON. MUDYIWA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. I mentioned that the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe has recently availed over US$41 million for the purchase of fuel. Money is therefore there to buy the fuel that we need and that has been brought into the country as of now. Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.

THE HON. SPEAKER: What is your point of order, can you be brief please.

          HON. G. K. SITHOLE: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir, I rise on a point of privilege in terms of Standing Rules Number 69 read in conjunction with Standing Rule Number 68 (d) and also with the requirements of the Constitution and in particular Section 119 and Section 66 which talks about the freedom of movement. The crisis in the nation Mr. Speaker Sir; of fuel and the crisis of increases in prices, I think calls upon all Parliamentarians whether you are ZANU PF or MDC, that we join hands like what we did in November 2017. Then invoke Section 97 – [HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear.] -

          THE HON. SPEAKER: What is your point of privilege Hon. Member?

          HON. G. K. SITHOLE: My point of privilege is that as a House I think it is high time that we invoke Section 97 which talks about impeachment. Why do I say so? Section 97 (6) says – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] -

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Order, order Hon. Chibaya. If you raise such issues, you better bring a motion in the House. I want to recognise I think there are two Hon. ladies who were supposed to ask last time and I indicated that I would give them time.

          *HON. MAJAYA: Thank you Mr. Speaker. My question is directed to the Minister of Industry and Commerce and in his absence, I direct my question to the Leader of the House. My question is - what is the Government policy concerning spiraling of prices in the country and especially for basic commodities including clothes and other goods which are being sold in United States Dollars?

          *THE MINISTER OF DEFENCE AND WAR VETERANS (HON. MUCHINGURI-KASHIRI): Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir. I believe those who were watching ZBC-TV yesterday, those who listened to the radio as well as those who read newspapers will agree that Government have stated section by section regarding steps it is taking to address the pricing system issue including prices which have skyrocketed. These are issues I cannot exhaustively talk about today and I will request the responsible Minister to bring a Ministerial Statement to this House tomorrow and for him to inform all sectors of the economy what is happening. I will do so in my capacity as the Acting Leader of the House. Thank you.

          HON. MAVETERA: My question is directed to the Hon. Deputy Minister of Youth, Sport, Arts and Recreation. My question is - what affirmative action policy have you created in terms of Youth Empower Bank in view of the fact that youths are complaining that conditions of that bank are not favourable to the young people? Thank you.

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Order, order, Hon. Member seated at the back there, will you leave the Chamber. Hon. Member, number two from the back, that one in a white shirt there, yes.

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF YOUTH, SPORT, ARTS AND RECREATION (HON. SIMBANEGAVI): Mr. Speaker Sir, responding to the Hon. Member’s question, yes the Ministry has a policy in terms of youth empowerment. The Empower Bank that she referred to is also part of the affirmative action that the Government has taken in order to ensure that the youths are empowered. The requirements for the youths to be able to access funds in the Empower Bank are that, one has to be between 15-35 years. However, also looking at the situation that we have got some disadvantaged and marginalised young people, the bank will also consider young people between ages of 35-40 years to be able to access these funds. Of recent times, as a Ministry, we have oversight over the Empower Bank and we have instructed the bank to go out to the provinces to explain to the youths what they need to do in order to access these funds. Some of the requirements are that they need to open savings accounts with the Empower Bank and once they do so, they can access the loans.

          I am also aware Mr. Speaker Sir, that there are some challenges that the youths are raising in terms of access to the funds such as the stiffer collateral requirements that are needed. Most of the young people do not have these collateral requirements. As a Ministry, we have been having a marathon of meetings with the administration of the Empower Bank in order to be able to look at how we can assist to ensure that the bank becomes more youth friendly.

          HON. MAMOMBE: In the absence of the Minister of Higher and Tertiary Education, I will direct the question to the acting Leader of the House. My question is focusing on students in universities particularly when we are talking about the new dispensation and also the mantra that Zimbabwe is open for business. What are the measures in terms of academic freedoms within our tertiary institutions as well as the rampant increase of tertiary fees? This is also affecting the girl child because they are being abused by men who are forcing them into sexual harassment and abuse – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] -

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Order, I thought your question was complete. What was the latter part of the question?

          HON. MAMOMBE: I want to know what Government policy is in terms of supporting students by giving them grants and loans because they are facing difficult situations within their universities. We also want academic freedom and freedom of research within our universities without fear from intimidation by university authorities. 

THE HON. SPEAKER: You cannot ask two questions. The first question concerns the policy on giving grants to students. Am I right, especially the female students so that they are not harassed? That is the question directed to the Hon. Minister.

          THE MINISTER OF DEFENCE AND WAR VETERANS (HON. MUCHINGURI):  Mr. Speaker Sir, allow me to thank the Hon. Member for asking that very important question especially as it concerns the girl child. The girl child is dear to the Government of Zimbabwe as demonstrated by the empowerment programmes introduced by the Ministry of Women’s Affairs especially addressing disparities that existed within the educational system. At primary education level the representation was 50/50. At higher education level, the percentage dropped to 60/40 for women. At universities it was worse and dictated that the issue be redressed.

 As a result of that, Government came up with an arrangement with Eduloan financial organisation which opened up opportunities for both boys and girls so that we address the imbalance. Any girl child looking for a scholarship or grant, is now free to approach Eduloan. Every university in the country has a branch of Eduloan and that information is easily available at all higher and tertiary education institutions.

          Questions Without Notice were interrupted by THE HON. SPEAKER in terms of Standing Order No. 64.

APOLOGIES RECEIVED FROM MINISTERS

          THE HON. SPEAKER: The other Ministers who have sent apologies are:

1.    Hon. Dr. O.  Moyo, Minister of Health and Child Care;

2.    Hon. Dr. J. Mangwiro, Deputy Minister of Health and Child Care.

May I conclude that perhaps the Acting Leader of the House to assist by ensuring that we get the Ministerial Statement from the Minister of Industry and Commerce and also as soon as the Minister of Finance and Economic Development is back, we need another Ministerial Statement on the state of the economy. I will appreciate that if the message can be transmitted to the respective Ministers.

          HON. MLISWA: On a point of order. This is according to Standing Rule Number 17, which says that “at the commencement of every session there must be as many Committees designated according to Government portfolios”. The reason why I am saying this Mr. Speaker Sir, is that the sooner the Committees are in place - there are so many questions and issues happening, when are the Committees going to be put in place according to Standing Order Number 17?

          THE HON. SPEAKER: Your question is very relevant. The problem is that you are an independent Member of Parliament, so you are not affected by the processes of consultation. Your observation is very correct. The consultations between the ruling party and the opposition are winding up on one or two things and they have assured me that by tomorrow they should give me their final position so that we can announce.  Thank you.

ORAL ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS WITH NOTICE

TITLE DEEDS FOR GWERU TENANTS IN GOVERNMENT RENTED HOUSES

          1.  HON. D DUBE asked the Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing to state when Government will issue title deeds to tenants in Government houses in Gweru that were acquired under the rent-to-buy scheme.

          THE MINISTER OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC WORKS AND NATIONAL HOUSING (HON. J. MOYO): Thank you Mr. Speaker.  I want to thank Hon. Dube for asking me the question.  Mr. Speaker Sir, by way of background, I would like to inform this august House that the Government, in the mid 1990s, 1995 – 1996 initiated a Home Ownership Scheme for different categories of home seekers countrywide.  In those schemes, the Government would construct the dwelling structures to completion and qualifying beneficiaries would then move in.  A down payment of 50% of the purchase price, which constituted a deposit, was a condition precedent to occupation of the dwelling unit.  The balance would then be amortised over a 24-year period.

          However, in the case of Gweru urban, where we have flats in Mutapa and houses in Mkoba 7, which is where the Hon. Member is concerned, the housing estate is not surveyed to title because title registration for flats will be under sectional title.  The cost of the title survey must be met by the property owner and once the owners have a functional residence association, they would then approach our Ministry for the initiation of title-surveying of the flats since they are the ones who will meet the costs.  In the case of houses, an individual can approach the Ministry and have their stand title-surveyed.  Similarly, the individual concerned would also meet the costs for the title survey.

          Mr. Speaker Sir, let me also emphasise that the process of title registration is triggered on an individual basis, where a beneficiary is fully paid up in respect of the purchase price of the property in question.  Beneficiaries concerned should therefore approach the Ministry with a view to get assistance in obtaining title.  I would urge the Hon. Member that our offices in Gweru can help those who want to obtain title.  However, tenants wishing to obtain title for the properties they currently occupy should observe the following;

1.    The property that one wishes to register for the title must be fully paid for;

2.    They need to clear all council dues and obtain a rates clearance certificate of occupation from the planning section of the Gweru City Council;

3.    The property should be title surveyed;

4.    Tenants issued with rates clearance certificate of occupation from the City Council would approach the Ministry’s urban state lands management department for processing. 

This should be done and we all urge the Hon. Member to assist where he can.  I thank you.

          HON. P. D. SIBANDA: Thank you Hon. Speaker.  With your indulgence, the Hon. Minister spoke about accommodation – I want to find out what the Government policy is with regards to Government accommodation that is occupied by civil servants, especially those who are made to continuously pay rentals and not given the opportunity to own those houses?

          HON. J. MOYO: Madam Speaker, there are two types of house owned by the Government.  There are title houses which are administered on behalf of ministries; those are reserved such that they are not sold because when a Ministry intends to transfer workers from one work station to the other, we will be constrained if we sell all the houses.  Then, there are houses called fund houses, yes, those can be sold to sitting tenants and we have been selling to sitting tenants.  So, there is a separation.  If a house is tied to the Ministry of Education and the Ministry intends to use the house when they transfer workforce from one area to the other, we will not be able to sell those houses.  I thank you.

          HON. GABBUZA: Thank you Madam Speaker.  In line with reserved houses, how do they reconcile a situation where we have people who are non-civil servants, neither have they ever been civil servants but they occupy those houses whilst civil servants have no houses.

          HON. J. MOYO: Thank you Madam Speaker.  I would like to be furnished with information regarding those who are not civil servants but continue to occupy Government houses whilst civil servants are waiting.  Thank you.

REFURBISHMENT OF ROADS IN GWERU URBAN RENTED HOUSES

          2.  HON. D. DUBE asked the Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing to state when roads in Gweru urban currently in a bad state will be refurbished.

          THE MINISTER OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC WORKS AND NATIONAL HOUSING (HON. J. MOYO): Thank you Madam Speaker Ma’am.  I want to thank Hon. Dube for asking me the question.  Madam Speaker, may I inform this august House that the state of the roads network in Zimbabwe worsened up to the year 2017 because of the excessive and incessant rains.  The condition of the roads was so bad in Gweru and other places and other places that the Government displayed a state of disaster in February, 2017.

          In 2017, Gweru had an allocation of $470, 741 but the actual funds disbursed by ZINARA amounted to $1, 797, 335, 045.  More funding was availed because of the state of disaster declared by the Government and the City Council had requested for extra funding to work on the road from town, leading to Midlands State University and this was done.  In 2018, Gweru had an allocation of $2,640 000 and the actual disbursement was $2 371 480.  Part of the allocation was used for works carried over from 2017.  During the same year, Gweru was allocated $126 660 for routine maintenance by ZINARA. 

Procurement procedures delayed the council in implementing documented road works plans.  Gweru has $2,3 million worth of own resources to complement ZINARA efforts.  The City council satisfactorily completed the road network totaling 27kms.  The technical committee in the emergency road rehabilitation programme has encouraged Gweru City Council to speed up their work so that maximum ground is covered before the onset of the rainy season.  I thank you.  

HON. MADZIMURE:  Thank you Madam Speaker.  Madam Speaker, councils used to maintain their own roads because they used to get 100 percent of all the motor licence fees.  Since ZINARA took over, that is when we started seeing the continuous deterioration of roads.  Can the Minister consider allowing the local authorities to retain the licence fees that they get from the vehicles within their local authorities.

HON. J. MOYO:  Madam Speaker, the issue of vehicle licences and how the collection of fees has become centralised is a matter that is being discussed to make sure that the money that is collected goes to the councils in accrual basis rather than on an allocative basis.  On an accrual basis, the City Councils are able to know exactly when they will get the money on a regular basis but the collection of those fees through our post offices has created even better throughput than the councils were able to experience.  While the collection can remain, what we are discussing is such that there is predictability in terms of when those councils will get their money.  If we do it on an accrual basis, the councils will be able to maintain the roads through those fees. 

Later on, the fees that will be coming from ZINARA on an allocative basis are the fees that ZINARA will be collecting from your fuel levy.  A separation between fuel levy and the collection that is related to vehicle licences is what we want to disaggregate.  I thank you. 

HON. CHIKWINYA:  Thank you Madam Speaker.  My supplementary question arises from the fact that the Minister acknowledges that the money is supposed to be disbursed on a regular basis from ZINARA to the local authorities.  How regular is the basis and what procedures are supposed to be done by the local authorities in terms of accounting for the disbursed funds and therefore, accessing the other allocation?

HON. J. MOYO:  Madam Speaker, the accrual basis for all vehicle licences is a three monthly cycle.  We have asked all the local authorities to state all the vehicles that are registered within their boundaries.  Right now, the local authorities no longer know what vehicles are registered within their council areas.  This is known by checking the addresses of those vehicle licences.  The local authorities are doing their work and we think that once that work is done, we will be able to say, on a three monthly cycle, can you ensure that that part of the money which relates to vehicle licences is given to the local authorities without using the allocative system. 

CONSTRUCTION OF SEPTIC TANKS AND SHALLOW WELLS

3.  HON. CHIDZIVA asked the Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing when Government will offer title deeds to residents of Highfield West whose houses were acquired under the rent to buy scheme.

THE MINISTER OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC WORKS AND NATIONAL HOUSING (HON. J. MOYO):  Madam Speaker, I had approached the Speaker to request for deferment of question numbers 3, 5, 6 and 8, we are still researching on them.  I can answer the others.

GWERU CITY COUNCIL TOWN CLERKS

4.  HON. MAVHUNGA asked the Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing to clarify to the House who is entitled to benefit from houses sold to sitting tenants in Unit N ZRP Camp between the sitting police officers and Zimbabwe Republic Police as an institution.

THE MINISTER OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC WORKS AND NATIONAL HOUSING (HON. J. MOYO):  Madam Speaker, I want to thank Hon. Mavhunga for asking the question.  Madam Speaker, the houses in question fall under the jurisdiction of Chitungwiza Town Council.  On the issue of disposal, the sitting tenant has the first right of refusal to the said properties.  We are in discussion with Chitungwiza Municipality.  I thank you.

DISBURSEMENT OF SOCIAL WELFARE GRANTS TO CHILDREN OF PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES

7.  HON. CHIMINA asked the Minister of Local Government, Public Works and National Housing whether the Ministry will consider incorporating Woodlands suburb to Gweru City Council since the suburb’s services are provided for by the said local authority.

 THE MINISTER OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT, PUBLIC WORKS AND NATIONAL HOUSING (HON. J. MOYO):  Madam Speaker, I want to thank Hon. Chimina for the question.  My immediate answer Madam Speaker is that until 2023, we are not able, in terms of the Constitution to change the boundaries of any local authority or any ward in the country.  So, we cannot do it right away but the services can continue to come from Gweru City Council but we cannot change the boundaries.  We are bound by the Constitution. 

HON. CHINYANGANYA:  Madam Speaker, my supplementary question – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] – Can I be protected?

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  Order, order.

HON. CHINYANGANYA:  When is the Government starting to roll out command housing – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] –

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  Order, Hon. Members.

HON. MAMOMBE:  I am rising on a point of order Madam Speaker.  Can we have protection in this House?  That back bench is disturbing – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] –

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER:  Order, Hon. Members.  Hon. Member, may you repeat your supplementary question.

HON. CHINYANGANYA:  When is the Government starting to roll out command housing programme because there is acute shortage of accommodation within the urban areas?  I thank you.

HON. J. MOYO:  Madam Speaker, I need your protection.  This question on command housing is not related to what I have just answered, I could give a statement but it is something that would need me to make a statement in the House about what we are doing about command housing. 

REVIEW OF PENSION PAY-OUTS

9.  HON. SITHOLE asked the Minister of Public Service, Labour and Social Welfare to state when pension payouts will be reviewed upwards in view of the high costs of living.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE, LABOUR AND SOCIAL WELFARE (HON. MATUKE):  Thank you Madam Speaker.  May I request that questions 9 and 10 be deferred so that the Minister can attend to the questions when he comes next week.

          *HON. G. K SITHOLE:  Thank you madam Speaker. I am the one who raised question 9.  The Minister was here and I am surprised he is no longer here.  The deputy is here so he should respond to the question.  Can you respond to the question?  We did not come here to play.

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE, LABOUR AND SOCIAL WELFARE (HON. MATUKE):  Madam Speaker, I requested that questions number 9 to 13 be deferred to allow the Minister to come and make her presentation.

          HON. MADZIMURE:  Madam Speaker, the reason for this session is for Ministers to be given enough time to go and research.  The Minister of Public Service, Labour and Social Welfare was here.  She was fully aware of these questions and there is no reason whatsoever why she just disappeared without answering the questions.  Why then do we give notices?

          THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: The Minister gave her apologies.  She has been called for some other duties.  - [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

HON. B. DUBE:  Madam Speaker, question number 14 is a repetition and the Minister has already answered it in another question before this.

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE, LABOUR AND SOCIAL WELFARE (HON. MATUKE):  Can I ask that all the questions directed to the Minister be deferred.

DISTRICT POLICE OFFICE FOR MBERENGWA

18.    HON. ZHOU asked the Minister of Home Affairs and Cultural Heritage to state when Mberengwa would have its own District Police Office in view of the rampant cases of murder in the areas.

          THE MINISTER OF HOME AFFAIRS AND CUTURAL HERITAGE (HON. MADIRO):  Madam Speaker, I would like to thank the Hon. Member for asking the question, ostensibly seeking clarification on when a Police District Office, specifically for Mberengwa would be established in view of what he terms ‘rampart cases of murder in the area’.  Let me from the onset point out to the Hon. Member that ZRP Mberengwa is a station that falls under the purview of Zvishavane district. 

This district already has its own Officer Commanding whom the member correctly refers to as the Dispol.  May it please the Hon Member to note that Zvishavane district has four operational stations under its command and these are Mberengwa, Zvishavane, Buchwa and Mataga. ZRP Mberengwa is only 31km from Zvishavane and in this regard it is not feasible to establish yet another district, given the distance that separates the location of ZRP Mberengwa and ZRP Zvishavane district.  Madam Speaker, in short, there is already Dispol or Officer Commanding District which is ZRP Zvishavane District Headquarters and this is the district where ZRP Mberengwa falls under.

          Madam Speaker, the Hon member talked about the rampant cases of murder in Mberengwa.  Indeed, it is true that in the past three weeks, three cases of murder were committed in Mberengwa.  These murders emanated from disputes during beer drinks.  In order to curb such crimes, the Zimbabwe Republic Police has since increased patrols in Mberengwa.  Additional manpower has been seconded to the area to intensify patrols and at the same time raise awareness on the effects of engaging in criminal activities.  The ZRP is also currently intensifying community engagement processes to find a lasting solution to this problem.  These strategies are also being employed throughout the country.  I thank you Madam Speaker.

          *HON. T. ZHOU:  Hon. Speaker Ma’am, I want to thank the Minister for that response.  The Minister is explaining that these are disputes that will have arisen at the beer halls and I would want to understand that, so far how many arrests have they made for the three people he mentioned who were murdered?

          *HON. MADIRO:  Hon. Zhou posed a question asking how many people have been arrested so far.  I am not in a position to respond to that question now but I will need to go back and verify how many people have been arrested so far. 

          HON. T. P. MLISWA:  Thank you Madam Speaker Ma’am.  The issue of the Mberengwa extends to many other issues in terms of the murder cases that have arisen.  You have Kwekwe, the murder cases have arisen, Kadoma they have arisen, Cheguru and Norton and this is because of people carrying machetes.  In Kwekwe if I am not mistaken you have three to five a day.  So, what corrective measures is your Ministry taking because you are limiting it only to Mberengwa that you have intensified Mberengwa?

So, from a national point of view, what have you done because the murder cases have risen and this is from a national point of view?  So, what have you done to address such issues from a national point of view?  Thank you. 

          HON. MADIRO:  Madam Speaker Ma’am, the question by Hon. Mliswa that ZRP is concentrating in Mberengwa only – I want to inform the Hon. Member that of late, Members could have noticed an increase in roadblocks by the ZRP, especially in areas which are being affected by these incidences. 

May I also remind the Hon. Member that it is a crime to move around with dangerous weapons and anyone seen holding or possessing dangerous weapons will be arrested.  In short, that is my answer that we are aware of your concerns and we are increasing the presence of the police in those areas.  Thank you very much.

          HON. T. P. MLISWA:  Madam Speaker Ma’am, I do not think the Minister is aware that the police is also said to be involved in protecting these criminals and a good example is one in Norton where somebody was stabbed.  I recall the kombi conductors approached the officer commanding the depot saying that, you have betrayed us because we told you that this person was found at this place and you did not but we assure you that we will bring this person to you dead or alive.  And, true to their word, they apprehended the person and brought him to Norton Police Station and it now goes to the point that the police were involved in these murderers escaping because some of them are able to also give them money.  I am talking about the corruption in the police force which is leading to these culprits not being arrested and what are you doing about that?

          HON. MADIRO:   Madam Speaker, the level of corruption in the country is deplorable; not necessarily with public officials only but in the private sector as well.  Madam Speaker the Government does not at all tolerate corruption and it does not matter where it is practiced – whether it is within the police or otherwise.  And, where specific information is brought before us, definitely action will be taken against those corrupt officers.  Thank you. 

MAIZE HARVESTED DURING THE PERIOD 2014 – 2018

19  HON. CHINANZVAVANA asked the Minister of Lands, Agriculture, Water, Climate and Rural Resettlement to state the following for the period 2014 to 2018 –

a)     Tonnage of maize harvested in Zimbabwe;

b)   Yield per hectare of maize;

c)    Money allocated towards  agricultural activities; and

d)   Amount of money received from international donors and other agencies.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LANDS, AGRICULTURE, WATER, CLIMATE AND RURAL RESETTLEMENT (HON. HARITATOS):  Thank you Madam Speaker.  Thank you to the Hon. Member for the question regarding maize during the period of 2014 to 2018 and the Hon. Member has broken the question into four.

The tonnage of maize harvested in Zimbabwe for the period of 2014 to 2018 is as follows:

- in the year 2014 - 1 456 153 metric tonnes;

- in 2015 – 742 225 metric tonnes;

- in 2016 – 511 816 metric tonnes;

- in 2017 – 2 155 526 metric tonnes; and

- In 2018 – 1 700 702 metric tonnes.

          The Hon. Member’s question b) regards to yields per hectare of maize:

-         in 2014 we had an average yield of 0.880 metric tonnes per hectare;

-         in 2015 we had an average of 0.480 metric tonnes per hectare;

-         in 2016 we had 0.44 metric tonnes per hectare;

-         in 2017, we had 1.150 metric tonnes per hectare; and

-         in 2018, we had 0.990 metric tonnes per hectare.

The Hon. Member had a third question with regards to money allocated towards agricultural activities:

-         in the year 2014, the money that was allocated towards agricultural activities was $155 256 000;

-         in 2015 - $225 529 900;

-         in 2016 - $163 821 000;

-         in 2017 - $309 641 600;

-         in 2018 - $521 415 000.

The Hon. Member asked the fourth question with regards to funds received from developmental partners and funds received from developmental partners are accounted for by the Ministry responsible for Finance and Economic Development.  Thank you Madam Speaker.

HON. CHINANZVAVANA:  Madam Speaker, my supplementary question goes to say, is the money that is allocated towards agricultural activities enough to pay our grain farmers every year according to those four allocated or we are using the donor fund?

HON. HARITATOS: Thank you Madam Speaker. First and foremost, I would like to recognise the Government’s efforts of paying the farmers in time. In the last two years, we have had considerable amount of support from our Government to pay our farmers in time. However, I would like to have some time to be able to research and get back to you on the exact figures as they require extensive research. Thank you Madam Speaker.

HON. MADZIMURE: Madam Speaker, from what the Minister says, it appears there is a variance of between 75-100% in terms of yearly national yield per hectare over time. In one year, it was 0,4 tonnes per hectare yet in another year it was 1,1tonnes per hectare. Therefore, can the Minister explain the real cause of such variances because with such inconsistencies it means there is a lot of money being lost in the production process when we go by the yield variances.

HON. HARITATOS: Thank you Madam Speaker and I would like to answer the Hon. Member’s question in two parts. First and foremost, we receive continuous and superb support from the Government through the Command Agriculture initiative. What this has meant is an increase in our yields and production levels as a country due to the support from our Government. Secondly, with regards to 2015/16, we had poor rains. The same factor also affected our 2016 yields but in 2017, we had very good rains which further assisted us to achieve higher yields.

*HON. G. K. SITHOLE: Thank you very much Madam Speaker. My supplementary goes to the Deputy Minister of Agriculture…

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Hon. Member, may you please speak in English.

*HON. G. K. SITHOLE: Madam Speaker, the Constitution of Zimbabwe allows me to also speak in languages other than English.

THE HON. DEPUTY SPEAKER: Alright Hon. Member, it is fine and you can go ahead.

          *HON. G. K. SITHOLE: Madam Speaker, my question is directed to the Deputy Minister who is saying that the Government has been assisting the agricultural sector through funding procurement of inputs such as fertilisers. However, the agricultural sector that he is talking about has other private players playing a major role towards the success of the Command Agriculture programme such as Sakunda Petroleum. What we want to know is - when did the Government start using the Procurement Act in acquiring its inputs and implements to ensure transparency in Government’s operations? I thank you.

          * HON. HARITATOS: I thank you Madam Speaker and I also thank the Hon. Member for the question he has posed. Madam Speaker, our Ministry is not the one that deals with Government tenders and so, I am ill qualified to respond to that question. Thank you Madam Speaker.

          *HON. MADZIMURE: Madam Speaker, the question raised by Hon. G. K. Sithole is of high significance. The Minister cannot tell us that he does not know the tender procedure that is followed in their Ministry unless he is telling us that he does not respect this House at all. That is a key question and if he wants, we can put it across in English if he does not properly understand Shona. This question is very legitimate because at the end of the day it is the taxpayer who will pay for that Command Fund. The question is therefore very legitimate and the Minister must answer it.

          HON. HARITATOS: Thank you Madam Speaker.  First and foremost, we must recognise the institution called the State Procurement which acts independently of our Ministry. If the Hon. Member would however like to have a response in that respect, he can write to us and we may ask and consult with them to write him directly in response. Thank you Madam Speaker.

CLASSIFICATION OF SUGAR CANE PRODUCTION UNDER THE COMMAND AGRICULTURE PROGRAMME

20. HON. MUSIKAVANHU asked the Minister of Lands, Agriculture, Water, Climate and Rural Resettlement to explain why sugar cane production in Chiredzi District is not classified under the Command Agricultural Programme. 

          THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LANDS, AGRICULTURE, WATER, CLIMATE AND RURAL RESETTLEMENT (HON. HARITATOS): Thank you Madam Speaker and thank you to the Hon. Member who asked regarding sugar cane production under Command Agriculture. To-date, we have the highly successful Command Agriculture initiative which covers maize, soya beans, cotton, fisheries and livestock. There are other numerous commodities that are being proposed to be considered under this initiative and I take it that the sugar cane production is what the Hon. Member is proposing for now. In that regard, consultations are going to be conducted to determine possibilities and feasibility of the proposed commodities and may you also take note that the sugar cane production is being financed through contract farming by Tongaat Hullets and, it has a ready market. Thank you.

           HON. MUSIKAVANHU: Thank you very much Madam Speaker.  I thank the Minister but for clarification purposes, Tongaat Hullets is not supporting sugar cane farmers under any contract arrangement. The sugar cane farmers in the lowveld desperately need the respective support from Government. We are producing a strategic crop that is contributing towards ethanol production for the country. Thank you.

            HON. HARITATOS: Thank you Madam Speaker. I will consult and get back to the Hon. Member regarding the issue in question.

HON. CHIKWINYA:  On a point of order, Mr. Speaker.  Madii kumbosiya Tatenda ambogara pachigaro chenyu timboona – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.]- Hon. Tatenda ngavambobatowo chigaro in promotion of youth empowerment – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.]-

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Order, order in the House.  Your point of order has been overruled Hon. Member.  That job is the prerogative of the Speaker’s Panel and the Speaker himself.  It is overruled.

[Time limit]

HON. MGUNI:  Mr. Speaker Sir, I move that you extend the time for Questions with Notice by 10 minutes.

HON. PARADZA:  I second.

HON. MPARIWA: Thank you Hon. Speaker.  Can I get clarification or information from the Deputy Minister of Lands, Agriculture, Water, Climate and Rural Resettlement on whether the Government has been able to attend the 560 metric tonnes of grain reserve as required by law now that he has hailed the programme on Command Agriculture?  Thank you.

THE DEPUTY MINISTER OF LANDS, AGRICULTURE, WATER, CLIMATE AND RURAL RESETTLEMENT (HON. HARITATOS):  Thank you Hon. Speaker Sir.  I would like to make it known that this question is not part of sugar cane, but I will answer it non-the-less, Hon. Speaker.

We have a strategic reserve of 500 000 metric tonnes, not 560 metric tonnes.  We have a strategic reserve of 500 000 metric tonnes and it is in place.  Zimbabwe is safe; we have no scare of hunger.  Thank you Hon. Speaker – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.]- 

HON. MADZIMURE:  Mr. Speaker, if the Hon. Minister can clarify that despite the fact that soya beans is part of the Command Agriculture, we have a serious shortage of soya beans.  Can you explain the reason why we have a shortage of soya beans?

HON. HARITATOS:  Thank you Hon. Speaker.  Again, I would like to make it known that the question that is being supplemented regards to sugar cane and not soya beans, but I will answer the question at hand.  The problem that we have with soya beans is a similar problem that we have with wheat whereby we do not have enough irrigation.  This is something that our Ministry is looking into with a view to support ing our farmers with regards to irrigation for them to grow more wheat and soya beans. So we have less demand on imports and we become a net exporter in a few years to come.  Thank you Hon. Speaker.

HON. MGUNI:  Mr. Speaker Sir, I move that we move on to question numbers 44 and 45 while the Minister is still there.

DEPLOYMENT OF THE ARMY ON 1ST AUGUST 2018

44  HON. CHIDZIVA asked the Minister of Defence and War Veterans Affairs to explain to the House who was responsible for the deployment of the army on 1st August, 2018.

THE MINISTER OF DEFENCE AND WAR VETERANS AFFAIRS (HON. MUCHINGURI-KASHIRI):  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  Allow me to start by thanking Hon. Chidziva for enquiring as to who was responsible for the deployment of Members of the Defence Forces on 1st August, 2018.

Mr. Speaker Sir, His Excellency the President and Commander-in-Chief of the Defence Forces responded to this unfortunate incident by appointing a Commission of Inquiry whose terms of reference, among others, is to establish circumstances leading to 1st August 2018 post election violence.  The Commission comprising local, regional and international members was appointed in terms of Statutory Instrument 181 of 2018, Proclamation 6 of 2018.

Mr. Speaker Sir, the Commission is to present its findings to the President within three months.  Public hearings have since started in earnest.  You may also be aware that members of the public who lost their loved ones regrettably or were affected have also started litigation processes.  The matter is now sub judice.  I thank you.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Order Hon. Members.  The first thing that I would want to say is that I would like to thank the Minister of Defence and War Veterans Affairs.  Why, because this question was not supposed to be entertained in this House. The President appointed this Commission that is still doing its own work.  So, we must thank the Minister for what she has done.  I cannot entertain any supplementary questions.  No, not on this one, I have overruled it.

Questions with Notice were interrupted by THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER in terms of Standing Order No. 64.

WRITTEN SUBMISSION TO QUESTIONS WITH NOTICE

INDEPENDENT COMPLAINTS MECHANISM BILL

45  HON. MATSUNGA asked the Minister of Defence and War Veterans Affairs to explain

(a)              why a Bill to provide for independent complaints mechanism about the misconduct of and harm caused by members of the security services has not been brought  before Parliament; and

(b)            when the Bill will be brought before Parliament as stipulated by Section 210 of the Constitution.

THE MINISTER OF DEFENCE AND WAR VETERANS AFFAIRS (HON. MUCHINGURI-KASHIRI):  I would like to start by thanking Hon. Matsunga.  Section 210 of the Constitution states that an Act of Parliament must provide an effective and independent mechanism for receiving and investigating complaints from members of the public about misconduct on the part of members of the security services and for remedying any harm caused by such misconduct.  This is a matter of great significance to the security agencies.  To this end, our legal officers are working on the principles of the Bill and a draft Bill for the consideration of Cabinet Committee on Legislation.  I thank you.

MOTION

BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

          HON. GONESE: I move that Orders of the Day Numbers 1 to 3 on today’s Order Paper be stood over until Order of the Day Number 4 has been dealt with. In moving this motion, I would like to indicate that I have already consulted the Government Chief Whip and we are in agreement so that we can deal with the motion. 

          HON. MPARIWA: I second.

          Motion put and agreed to.

MOTION

STRUCTURAL AND ECONOMIC CHALLENGES FACING ZIMBABWE

          Fourth Order read: Adjourned debate on motion on economic challenges affecting Zimbabwe.

          Question again proposed.

          HON. NDUNA: I want to thank the mover of this motion but in so doing, I want to add something on to the prayer of the motion. I want to propose an addition.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER (HON. MUTOMBA): I am reliably informed that your notice of amendment has not been received by the Clerks. Meanwhile can you proceed to debate this motion?

HON. NDUNA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir, I am guided accordingly. As I debate the motion that has been brought up by Hon. Dr. Mashakada, I am mindful of the wanton disregard of basic tenets of humanity that is currently obtaining in the community as we speak. There is however a worrying coordination and incidents from various stakeholders in the community outside this Parliament, in particular, the business community in their conduct.

Assuming there was any reason for anybody not to sell their product to an unsuspecting innocent citizen of Zimbabwe for any reason or otherwise, we would not have cement being held off, the pharmaceuticals being held off, tomatoes, juice and oil for the same reason or on the same day. This would maybe come up in various days for various reasons not a similar reason on the same day. This is the very first issue that I want to bring up. That issue speaks volumes of some mysterious cohesion of saboteurs coming in from various corners for a common cause to sabotage the economy of this country.

I ask and make a clarion call therefore that business should not indulge in petty partisan political machinations. They should confine themselves to business ethics alone. It is with a heavy heart that I stand here and join Hon. Dr. Mashakada in trying to call for a coordinated approach to try and decapitate the issue of discrepancies in terms of economic delivery which is currently grappling the society of Zimbabwe. I require therefore all other sectors that are mandated to deliver in terms of economic development in business to do so and not indulge in politics.

When you want to appeal to the man’s conscience, you go through their tummy. Just this yesterday going around the City of Harare was a ZCTU truck laden with some operatives who were calling for both boycott of commodities and escalation of prices. One wonders as to the motivation of such an action – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] -  Whilst the motion and the notion is noble on the face of it, it speaks volumes of what should be done for the betterment and good order of the unsuspecting innocent citizens out there according to Section 119 where we are supposed to be here on a representative role.

I stand here again to say imbedded in this motion is a lot of injustices where on the face of the motion, it looks so flowery and very well intended but deep down if we look at this motion, if it is confined to this House without any additives and without some other people in the community trying to assassinate the economic development through political machinations, this definitely would see the light of day.

I speak of companies that are being supported by the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe. Just this yesterday Hon. Dr. Mashakada spoke of a deficit of US$2.3bn where RBZ borrowed without the approval of Parliament where it is supposed to borrow about US$700m. I am together with him only if he so comes holistically for economic development. Where I want to make sure that I differ is where these companies are given support and they do not deliver. They wantonly go to the retailers and increase the prices where there is support in the wholesale sector in terms of production and in terms of output and that has not changed.  Then when you see a bag of cement now tripling in price, that boggles the mind.  There is Statutory Instrument 64 that seeks amongst other things to protect the very industry that is being supported by the very lender of last resort RBZ in terms of foreign currency.  Mr. Speaker Sir, what then is the motive if not to destroy, to kill and to maim the economic development machinations of this country – [HON. MEMBERS:  Hear, hear.] – What then is the motive of those that are embedded in petty partisan political machinations instead of economic development?  What then is the motive Mr. Speaker Sir, if not to make sure that the people of Zimbabwe suffer for lack of the basic commodities?  I want to bring you back to what I said Mr. Speaker Sir.  If you want to appeal to a man’s conscience, you go through the tummy and here is the tummy that has been affected.  What you are going to do Mr. Speaker Sir, you are not going to go through to the conscience.  What the opposition has not managed to get through the ballot box, they should not come and try and get through the economic development of this country – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] –

          HON. MASHAKADA:  Point of order.

          THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Order in the House.  What is your point of order?

          HON. MASHAKADA:  Thank you Hon. Speaker.  Hon. Nduna has made serious allegations and he is casting aspersions about the intentions of the opposition – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] – He cannot prove to this House the allegation that the opposition could not get what it wanted through the political route and therefore it is using the economic route.  He cannot prove that so that statement must be withdrawn.

          THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Thank you.  Hon. Nduna – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] – Order!  Order in the House Hon. Members!  Hon. Nduna, may you avoid provocation.  You have started very well but avoid provocation.  Say out what you want to say but no provocation.  Thank you.

          HON. NDUNA:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  Mr. Speaker Sir, lest we go the route that the other Hon. Members went through that were in the Seventh and Eighth Parliament, we need to come here and adhere to the ethos and values of what the people of our constituencies sent us here to do – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – They did not send us here to come and cripple the economy of Zimbabwe.  They did not send us here to come and castigate economic development.  They did not send us here Mr. Speaker Sir to come and wantonly increase prices.

          HON. MADZIMURE:  On a point of order Mr. Speaker Sir, the Hon. Member is challenging the Chair.  The Hon. Member is repeatedly uttering inflammatory statements – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] –

          THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Order in the House Hon. Members!  Hon. Nduna, that was a direct challenge to the Chair.  I had actually given a ruling that you should not provoke.  Your points were quite lucid and very meaningful but now you seem to be going out of topic and out of motion. 

          HON. NDUNA:  Thank you for your guidance Mr. Speaker.  Mr. Speaker Sir, I want to talk of the formalisation of the informal sector.  Mr. Speaker Sir, the formalisation of the informal sector is one panacea and one antidote that could see the realisation of a lot of income to the Government fiscus.  I see here in the prayer of Hon. Mashakada where he seems to believe that there is a lot of unemployment whereas a lot of employment has gone to the informal sector.  It is incumbent and prudent on Government Mr. Speaker Sir and I call on the Executive to make ways and plans of formalising the informal sector.  This is one way that we could generate a lot of income for the fiscus.  This is one point which I want to support my colleague Hon. Mashakada in his quest for economic development, nothing else but the quest for economic development – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] –

          THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Hon. Nduna, speak through the Chair. 

          HON. NDUNA:  Mr. Speaker Sir, there is more than a million artisanal miners out there whose collections and delivery of gold to Fidelity can be streamlined in a manner that is going to see the royalties of the gold delivered by them being accrued to Government’s fiscus.  There is a year Mr. Speaker Sir, Hon. Mguni would remember, where there was an operation called ‘chikorokoza chapera’.  Gold deliveries to Fidelity fell from 18 tonnes in that year to one tonne per year Mr. Speaker Sir.  Now it is very unwise to ignore that sector and say people are not employed.  They are employed in the informal sector, in the artisanal mining and we need to group and formalise them.

          Mr. Speaker Sir, as we speak, Hon. Minister Chitando has already alluded to the fact that this year he is looking at getting over and above 30 tonnes of gold deliveries to Fidelity.  Already the artisanal miners and small scale miners up to this date have delivered more than 15 tonnes of that expected 30 tonnes.  These people are not employed at OK or TM.  They are in the informal sector in the artisanal mining community which is termed small scale mining.  These people are employed except they are employed in a way that is not easy to fathom and to see by a [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.]

          THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER (HON. MUTOMBA):  Order, can the hon. member be heard in silence please?

          HON. NDUNA:  It is not easy Mr. Speaker to realise by a simple eye and simple conscience.  It will take deep introspection for somebody to realise that as we are endowed with copiours or ubiquitous amount of mineral wealth, these people who are extracting this mineral are employed as they are embedded in those shafts and tunnels.  Vanhu ava havagoni ku raper, havagone kuba. We would have removed the robbers from the street and we are extracting our minerals for the good order of the citizens of Zimbabwe and for our economic development.  This is why I say these people are employed and they are employed in a sector that is good for our economy.

          Mr. Speaker Sir, nyaya yekuti 1.25 dollar per day for 79% of our population – those facts do not speak to and about the people of Chegutu West Constituency and the people of Mashonaland West because this is where more than twenty minerals in Mashonaland West are being extracted out of the sixty minerals that this nation is endowed with.  This does not speak to the large section of the people of Zimbabwe and it is my clarion call that …

          THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Order Hon. Nduna.  Can you address the Chair?

          HON. NDUNA:  Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  I am sorry if I do get carried away but it is so that I can ventilate this issue eloquently in a manner that is vociferous, eloquent and effective.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Address it through the Chair.

HON. NDUNA: However, what I want to call for as we debate this motion is the issue of the people and the sectors that are being supported by the hard earned foreign currency by the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe (RBZ) to stick to their mandate in a manner that is not going to see them having either double standards or conflicted in their operations.  Let them stick to business and let those prices be depressed to the extent that the RBZ, them and the social contract so dictates so that we will not have unwanton or wanton assassination of our economy in Zimbabwe, aware that we are country that is using a multi-currency system which we do not print ourselves.  It is incumbent upon the producers to stick to their mandate and to stick to their mandate only. 

As I conclude, I call upon all sectors which are economic enhancers or those that are collecting revenue both in the private and public sector for them to be computerised because out of computerisation, you can generate more than three or fourfold the monies that you were collecting manually.  It happened in the toll gates, in third party insurance and public transport insurance ….

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Order Hon. Nduna.  Your time is up.

HON. NDUNA: May I just wind up.

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Thank you [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.]

HON. NDUNA:  I want to thank you for giving me this opportunity and I say alluta continua in terms of economic development.  I thank you. 

*HON. KARENYI:  Thank you Mr. Speaker.  Firstly, I would like to thank the people of Manicaland who voted overwhelmingly and gave me the opportunity to represent them here in Parliament and also for voting my President Mr. Chamisa who won the election [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.]

*THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Do not tempt me to evict anyone from this House today like what you did earlier on. So, please do not usurp my powers as the Speaker.

Hon. Member, the motion that was presented by Hon. Mashakada and was debated by other hon. members, I am sure you heard what they said. I thought they were off topic and I told them to debate the motion. What you have said is not in line with the motion. So, please may you restrict yourself to the motion itself?

*HON. KARENYI: Let me proceed by saying that - [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

          *THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Order in the House, Hon. Members! I think you did not understand what I said. The point that you mentioned that Mr. Chamisa won the election should be withdrawn.

          *HON. KARENYI: Let me say Mr. Speaker, if there are those people who were listening, I mentioned Manicaland where he won the election resoundingly. This motion calls for the unity of all Members of Parliament.

          HON. GANDAWA: Mr. Speaker, we did not hear the hon. member withdrawing her statement - [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – Presidential results of Zimbabwe are not announced in each province. 

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Order hon. members - [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – The Hon. Member that I have given the floor is addressing his point of order to the Speaker and it is only the Speaker who is supposed to rule on that point of order, not anyone else seated. Thank you.

          HON. GANDAWA: Mr. Speaker Sir, I did not hear my fellow Hon. Member and not by anyone else who is seated.  I thank you. – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

          HON. GANDAWA:  On a point of order Mr. Speaker Sir, I did not hear my fellow Hon. Member withdrawing her statement. . – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – Presidential results were announced and Hon. Mnangagwa won that election. – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – Results are not based on  – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – Mr. Speaker Sir, results for the President of Zimbabwe …

          THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Order, order Hon. Member, you point of order has been noted – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – [HON. GANDAWA: Mr. Speaker Sir, results …] – Order, order Hon. Member, your point of order has been noted. – [HON. GANDAWA:  Mr. Speaker Sir, the Presidential results are announced in total and not piecemeal.] -  [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – Order, order in the House Hon. Members – [HON. GANDAWA: Mr. Speaker Sir,...] – Order, order Hon. Member, please sit down your point of order has been noted.

          *Hon. Member I said, the point that you mentioned that Mr. Chamisa won the election should be withdrawn – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – The reason I am saying that you need to withdraw your statement is because you spoke of him winning the election in Manicaland Province and results are announced at national level and not at provincial or constituency levels.

          *HON. KARENYI:  Mr. Speaker, in this august House I represent Manicaland Province.  Furthermore, the votes that are at ZEC reflect that Mr. Chamisa won resoundingly in Manicaland Province.  So I do not know what you want me to withdraw because I would be lying if I were to withdraw – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

          *THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Order, order Hon. Member, what you are doing is defying the Speaker and since you are defying the Speaker, I will request you to go out.  Do not look at your colleagues to see what they are saying, please just address the Chair.

          *HON. KARENYI:  Let me proceed Mr. Speaker and say that Hon. Mashakada’s motion affects everyone in Zimbabwe…

          *THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Order, order Hon. Member are you contesting the Speaker’s decision?  I said that you should withdraw your statement.

          *HON. KARENYI:  Mr. Speaker, since you are saying I should withdraw, I will withdraw since you want to hear it but I do not know what I lied about in this issue.

          *THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Order, order Hon. Member, as the Speaker, I gave a ruling that you have to comply to.  – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

          Hon. Karenyi having walked up to the Chair.

          *HON. KARENYI:  The Hon. Speaker has requested that I withdraw my statement because it has nothing to do with the motion.  – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – Let me proceed with my debate – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

          MDC Opposition Hon. Members having broken into song, ‘Into oyiyenzayo siyayi zonda!

          *HON. KARENYI:  Let me rephrase my statement for better comprehension.  Mr. Chamisa won resoundingly in Manicaland Province where I come from – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – I also want to thank Hon. Mashakada for raising the motion that is affecting all Zimbabweans.

          When looking at this motion, let me say that all the people who are listening in the rural areas – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

          *THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER:  Order, order Hon. Members, may we please have some silence in this House.  Hon. Member, do not talk about Manicaland Province, we are talking about the nation at large. – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – Order, order Hon. Member your time to debate has elapsed

          [Time limit]

          *THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Hon. Member, your time is almost up and you have not said anything.  May you please wind up your debate.

          *HON. KARENYI: Mr. Speaker, let me say that everyone who is going to stand up to debate, we will make noise and ensure that they do not have time to debate because it is my right to debate what I want in this House – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

          *THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Order Hon. Member, may you sit down – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – Order Hon. Members, may you please lend me your ears.  Hon. Member, I understand that it is your right to debate but you said a statement that I have told you to withdraw and you wasted time defying what the Hon. Speaker had said.  So, can you conclude your debate.

          *HON. KARENYI: Mr. Speaker, it was not my problem, it was the problem of the other side which interrupted my debate.  The whole nation is aware that I failed to debate because of noise from ZANU PF.  I thank you.

          HON. D. S. SIBANDA: Mr. Speaker, my proposal is to extend time for the Hon. Member for another five minutes – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

          HON. N. NDLOVU: I second.

          HON. KASHIRI: I object – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

          THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Order Hon. Members.  There is an objection, so the extension…

          HON. MADZIMURE: On a point of order Mr. Speaker Sir.  Mr. Speaker, according to the rules, the moment you ask for any seconder before anyone has objected, you will have passed the position where the objection can stand.  These are the rules.

          THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Hon. Member, I have asked for an objection and an objection was raised.  I have actually overruled and my decision is standing.

          *HON. CHIBAYA: I want to thank the Speaker for giving me this opportunity.  I want to thank Hon. Mashakada for the motion he brought into this House as well as Hon. Biti for seconding the motion.  The motion before us Hon. Speaker, concerns the challenges that the Zimbabwean populace is facing, whether ZANU PF, MDC or even those who are not aligned to any party – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

          THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Order in the House Hon. Members.

          *HON. CHIBAYA: Thank you Mr. Speaker Sir.  My expectation in this House Hon. Speaker is that; as we were voted for by the people to  come here and represent them, everyone in this House has the mandate and right to stand up to debate as they please – [HON. MEMBERS: Hear, hear.] – Hon. Speaker, the issue that is before us here, out there – [AN HON. MEMBER: Kupi.] – In Mkoba Constituency where I am a representative – [Laughter.] – Hon. Speaker, for me to come here into this House, I was voted for by the people of Mkoba Constituency so that I can represent them.  For that reason, as I move on with my debate, I want to thank them for voting for me. 

          Further to this, let me say the exorbitant prices on goods is affecting everyone – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – Hon. Speaker, people are spending nights queuing at the banks waiting to withdraw their money.  As Parliament, if we do not debate these issues for the reason of sorting out the problems affecting our nation, I do not see any other platform where these issues will be discussed – [AN HON. MEMBER: Masanctions.] – [AN HON. MEMBER: Masanctions enzimbe dzamakatora kuChiredzi.] –

          Hon. Speaker, the debate that is before us in this House – our Ministers, which is the Executive will get the Hansard booklets to read as they reflect on what the Hon. Members of Parliament would have debated regarding the shortage of money – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – For the Ministers to come into this House to give what is called a Ministerial Statement, they will take what we would have discussed in this House as Hon. Members – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – Now, if we come to this House – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

Hon. Speaker, it is true that our children are completing degree programmes at Nust University or Midlands State University.  After graduating, those children are going out to sell air time in the streets because there is unemployment in the country - – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – If there is anyone who dispute the fact that there is unemployment in this country, I do not understand whether that individual lives in the country Zimbabwe that we all know.

Hon. Speaker, it is important that as Hon. Members who represent constituencies, if we are in this House, let us set aside party affiliations – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] – Let us focus on – [HON. MEMBERS: Inaudible interjections.] –

THE TEMPORARY SPEAKER: Order in the House Hon. Members.

HON. CHIBAYA: Hon. Speaker, we all underwent induction and when the Speaker Hon. Mudenda, when he was seated there said that, ‘I think we need to have another induction.’  I am sure you all heard that. Why?  Mr. Speaker Sir, the role and function of the Parliamentarians is to come up with legislation, carry out a representative role and perform the oversight function.  When we come to this House, let us separate rallies and Parliament business. 

*HON. NYABANI:  On a point of order.  Mr. Speaker Sir, we have a motion of spiralling prices of goods and now he is lecturing.  I do not know what he is saying.

*HON. CHIBAYA:  I want to thank you Mr. Speaker.  If we only debate without giving solutions, it is not enough.  As a country, I think the issue of Bond notes should be withdrawn so that we use the Rand in this country.  In the past when Bond notes were introduced, the Reserve Bank Governor said, if the Bond notes fail, he will resign.  We all know about it and we see what is happening in this nation.  The Bond notes are not working.  People are experiencing challenges.  The other major solution Mr. Speaker, is that for us to be able to address the challenges and come to an end, Zimbabwe should be given to Hon. Chamisa who won the election – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] –

HON. O. MGUNI:  Mr. Speaker Sir, I move that the debate do now adjourn – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.] –

HON. GONESE:  Mr. Speaker Sir, I wanted to seek clarification before your ruling – [HON. MEMBERS:  Inaudible interjections.]

HON. DR. MASHAKADA:  Mr. Speaker Sir, at this juncture, I move that the debate do now adjourn to tomorrow – [AN HON. MEMBER:  We are in Parliament, do not say hey hey hey.  That is treason.  She said Chamisa won the election.  She must withdraw.] –

HON. D. SIBANDA:  I second.

Motion put and agreed to.

Debate to resume:  Thursday, 11th October, 2018.

On the motion of HON. DR. MASHAKADA, seconded by HON. N. NDLOVU, the House adjourned at Five Minutes to Six o’clock p.m.

 

 

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National Assembly Hansard NATIONAL ASSEMBLY HANSARD 10 OCTOBER 2018 VOL 45 NO 11